Wednesday, February 6, 2013

"Phantom Musician"

















Sometimes, a story just needs to be told; if for no other reason than to mark a place in history, a point in time or to immortalize a life. The latter is the case in the story of “THE PHANTOM MUSICIAN”.

I thought long and hard about how I wanted to approach this article. How was I gonna tell you the story of this man's musical career without violating his privacy and his peace of mind? And then, laying in bed one night it came to me... I'm going to tell you his story, but I'm not going to focus completely on his music career because he's much more than that. I don't want you to wonder about his identity, I want you to marvel at his heart and by the time you're finished reading this multi-part article I want you to lust not after his songs but after the path he has chosen for his life and to gain the sort of peace he has reached and extends to others selflessly and without reward, well not the kind you can see or touch. His rewards are received and given to and from the heart.

I was privileged to befriend this amazing human being quite by accident. A simple post turned into a curiosity for me that I pursued. He did not seek out this interview, in fact he was quite reluctant and it didn't start out as an interview but more of a conversation that turned into something I felt needed to be shared.
Today the world is full of the cynical and self serving. It's rare to find someone who's heart is purely selfless, but when you do they stand out and they draw you to themselves because you can't help but want to be warmed by their glow. Western Levi (as he is known in Second Life) is such an individual.

I believe musicians have a special kinda heart, their ability to feel and see things around us the “normal” eye can't... (snickers) That's not to say musicians aren't “normal” though most of them would probably agree they are a bit eccentric and proud of it. I believe musicians have an insight into the world that most of us don't. They express their feelings and dreams not just in the written word but with music, the universal language that bridges the gap between poverty and riches while at the same time wrapping us all in a blanket of... happy ever afters and making us feel that they are singing directly to us.

Western Levi, a gentleman with his “darlins” and “sweethearts” captivated my interest right from the start and it's a conversation that feels like it picked up from some other place in time and will continue on to whatever awaits us next. This conversation has been a fun one and he made me do a bit of digging to figure out who he is and that was half the fun of writing this article, the other half has been this on going communication that enriches my days just by having the privilege of getting to know this man.
Not currently performing in SL our “phantom musician” spent years helping to build venues including Moonacy, manage and run shows with a friend. Many had no idea he played or co-wrote songs. He wasn't in this to self promote as he had done plenty of that in the real world during his earlier years. He's been around the SL music scene when there were no avies and only 8 bit sound. Eventually Dimi Van Ludwig got the musicians of that day from PalTalk over to SL.

Our conversation got cut short at this point so he could go finish up some studio work and it's at this point I want to tell you something about just a small part of how he gives back.

Two Weeks Of Christmas” isn't just a song title, it's a gift from his heart to the families of the victims of 9/11.

"Two Weeks of Christmas" started by a phone call to me as I was driving home from Nashville one cold night a few months before the holidays and asked what I do during christmas. I started talking about one christmas eve ...in a blizzard spotting an old man walking ...some feeling I got told me to stop and ask if he needed a ride. His family turned him away. I took him home with me. The person on the other end of that call was Moondoggirl Moomintoog; who turned the story into a song."


It's also about his yearly visit the week before and after Christmas to those who lost someone in 9/11. You see, he was scheduled to be there on 9/11, however; the day before he felt this strong urge to go then and so he did and his life was spared.

" I'll never be able to shake that ...why I was spared and so many not. "

The hardest for him was a 7 year old boy and asking what his dad was like and feeling honored that he picked him to speak to. As long as he lives the “phantom musician” will make this compassionate and healing round of visits.

This is only the tip of this iceberg, it goes much deeper. Stay tuned for more about our “phantom musician” in the next issue.

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